irresistible-revolution:

The Women Ridding Sri Lanka of Landmines

Jalini, 30, gets to work in the paddy fields in the ‘Vanni’, the ‘rice-bowl’ region of northern Sri Lanka. But she isn’t harvesting rice; rather she’s on the hunt for landmines, a deadly legacy of the violent 26 year-long conflict between the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers…until the various hidden landmines are identified and removed, the community in Thunnukai can’t work here. Jalini and her fellow de-miners have already found a dozen mines in this field alone, and believe there are some more. Across the north of Sri Lanka, an unknown number of land mines litter the once productive landscape, threatening lives and livelihoods.”



bell hooks resources

wretchedoftheearth:

themindislimitless:

If you have any more, or alternate links just in case these ever get removed, feel free to add to the list. Pass the resources along!

Black Women Intellectuals (pdf) (from Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life with Cornel West

youarenotyou:

ayenako:

Victoria Ruiz from Downtown Boys

so good

youarenotyou:

ayenako:

Victoria Ruiz from Downtown Boys

so good

thinksquad:

Today marks the anniversary of FDR signing executive order 9066, which authorized the “indefinite detention” of nearly 150,000 people on American soil.

The order authorized the Secretary of War and the U.S. Army to create military zones “from which any or all persons may be excluded.” The order left who might be excluded to the military’s discretion. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt inked his name to EO9066 on Feb. 19, 1942, it opened the door for the roundup of some 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese citizens living along the west coast of the U.S. and their imprisonment in concentration camps. In addition, between 1,200 and 1,800 people of Japanese descent watched the war from behind barbed wire fences in Hawaii. Of those interned, 62 percent were U.S. citizens. The U.S. government also caged around 11,000 Americans of German ancestry and some 3,000 Italian-Americans.